Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Black Efi resurrection

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Black Efi resurrection

    This one is a bit of a jigsaw puzzle at the minute. Shell has been on a spit in a clark 'temporary garage' in the barn for quite along time. There is a dehumidifier in there & up to now it has had several doses of jenolite and several coats of 'bonda primer', so should be fairly rust resistant! Annoyingly there were a few areas where the 2k high build primer reacted with either the bonda primer or (more likely) some older paint underneath despite leaving the bonda primer to cure for a very long time. Got the mess sanded off, reprimed with bonda primer, then put some barcoat on before putting some high build on. Should make better progress now, as long as I don't sand through the barcoat at any point! Good job I've got a parts list
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Bondo, a staple diet on any American car show, you must have too much time on your hands to restart on this project. See you Saturday
    1958 Ford Consul Convertible. I love this car
    1965 Ford Zodiac Executive. Fab cruiser
    1984 MG Montego EFi in black. Digital dash, nearer completion
    1997 Jaguar Xk8 Convertible. Such a fab car
    2004 MGZT cdti. Great workhorse
    2004 MGZT V8. I love this car

    Comment


    • #3
      Having time and making time are similar, but different things ha ha ha!

      Comment


      • #4
        A bit more done, front struts back together, rear hubs back together, old bushes off front arm (not as easy as I thought!), grease nipples fitted to front ball joints. I used a motorcycle cable greaser to grease the new handbrake cables, as they seemed bit stiff. It worked well, but was a bit messy I might make something better to do the job next time. The motorbike greaser just needed the holes in clamping washers and rubber drilling out a bit and the cable slots in the washers enlarging. I butchered a spark plug socket to fit strut bearing retaining nuts, a it had a hex on as well as the square drive, this meant that the allen key to hold the rod could fit through the square drive hole & I could still turn the nut using the hex. Quite a few different greases needed..EP2 bearing grease for the wheel bearing, No1 soft grease for the cable (I was torn between this & graphited grease, but any grease has to be better than no grease!), castrol PH white brake grease for the sliding parts on brake shoes/adjuster/handbrake arm (not easy to find these days, as nobody seems to bother & if they do they usually use copper grease, which turns to glue & stops everything working), red rubber grease for the pistons in the new wheel cylinder, graphite grease for the ball joints and a dab of copper grease on the wheel cylinder bolts.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by Doctordiesel77; 9th May 2022, 16:59.

        Comment


        • #5
          I always think moving parts look better with grease nipples fitted!
          Attached Files

          Comment


          • #6
            Do like the cable greasing tool, glad to see it's coming on nicely
            1958 Ford Consul Convertible. I love this car
            1965 Ford Zodiac Executive. Fab cruiser
            1984 MG Montego EFi in black. Digital dash, nearer completion
            1997 Jaguar Xk8 Convertible. Such a fab car
            2004 MGZT cdti. Great workhorse
            2004 MGZT V8. I love this car

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jeff Turbo View Post
              Do like the cable greasing tool, glad to see it's coming on nicely
              A wise man once told me that the two cheapest mechanics in the world were oil & grease, I took heed! I'll be glad when I get a few of these bits reattached, plan is to fit suspension, wheels, fuel tank, fuel & brake lines while it is still on the jig, then apply waxoyl and trundle it outside to fit other bits. At least I've got some spare time to work on it now..

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Doctordiesel77 View Post

                A wise man once told me that the two cheapest mechanics in the world were oil & grease, I took heed! I'll be glad when I get a few of these bits reattached, plan is to fit suspension, wheels, fuel tank, fuel & brake lines while it is still on the jig, then apply waxoyl and trundle it outside to fit other bits. At least I've got some spare time to work on it now..
                Very good, will look forward to seeing it done in the future
                1958 Ford Consul Convertible. I love this car
                1965 Ford Zodiac Executive. Fab cruiser
                1984 MG Montego EFi in black. Digital dash, nearer completion
                1997 Jaguar Xk8 Convertible. Such a fab car
                2004 MGZT cdti. Great workhorse
                2004 MGZT V8. I love this car

                Comment


                • #9
                  Got a bit more done, front wheel bearings seemed ok, but thought I'd change them anyway, the old fashioned impact screwdriver is invaluable for taking disc securing screws out and10 ton puller is useful for the hub and bearings, if it had failed then I'd have taken them to a press, but it did the job, so saved a couple of quid in fuel. Good job I did change them as,a) they are the ball race type and b) one ball was pitted, so they'd do what ball race ones were discontinued for, which was droning/rumbling.
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Getting the inner race that pops out of the bearing & stays on the hub off can be a bit of challenge, even though it isn't normally super tight. Gas axe or 1mm blade are often used in garages, but can leave damage on the hub. I wedged thm off about 1/8" with a hammer and chisel, then used this very handy little motor bearing puller, which made the job easy & probably quicker than getting the 'big boys' toys out! Bearings can be hard to refit, hammering or pressing can both damage them. My method was to put bearings in freezer for an hour and spindle in rayburn for a short time (too hot and it can melt grease out of bearings). You need to be careful getting the hot spindle to the vice, but then the bearing just presses in by hand, a bit of grease is a good idea, if it gets stuck halfway, you are back to press/hammer! Once the bearings are in I always ease the two inner races apart and shove as much grease as I can into the gap. Some will squeeze out when refitting the hub, hopefully some gets to the bearings.
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Excellent progress, nicely done and dare I say, very old school, as they say lol
                      1958 Ford Consul Convertible. I love this car
                      1965 Ford Zodiac Executive. Fab cruiser
                      1984 MG Montego EFi in black. Digital dash, nearer completion
                      1997 Jaguar Xk8 Convertible. Such a fab car
                      2004 MGZT cdti. Great workhorse
                      2004 MGZT V8. I love this car

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jeff Turbo View Post
                        Excellent progress, nicely done and dare I say, very old school, as they say lol
                        I can't see these new fangled modern ways catching on

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X