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Replacing a 1986 Maestro headlining

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  • Replacing a 1986 Maestro headlining

    Tools required :
    1 flat screwdriver, 1 small flat screwdriver, 1 Philips screwdriver, 1 razor knife, pair scissors, 1 plastic/rubber hammer, 1 flat plastic trim tool, wire brush, paint scraper, clean workbench/trestles/table. 1 X 2m roll of suitable headlining (mine came from Woollies) and a large spray can of heat resistant glue.

    Step 1.
    Unscrew sun visors, clips, hand grips, open sun roof and take off winder (if you have one) take out interior light and lastly the grey plastic clip at the rear. All rubber door and tailgate seals need to be taken off under the headliner. Remove strip around sun roof.

    Step 2.
    Carefully loosen headliner, best done from the rear passenger seats until it comes completely free and let it sit on front seat headrests, carefully and slowly shuffle backwards out of the tailgate. Get out of car, go to the tailgate and extract headliner. (*** see below)

    Step3.
    Place liner on trestles (or workbench or table) and slowly, carefully remove old headlining material. Clean up old residue on headliner panel (scraper, wire brush) checking for any cracks, splits or broken parts, repair as necessary.

    Step 4.
    Place material loosely on panel and trim off at one end material, leaving approximately 2 inches overhang on both ends, keep large off-cut for later. Trim material along edges also leaving about 2 inches overhang, make sure you leave enough material (you’ll need that to glue to side and rear).

    Step 5.
    You have 2 choices, glue the complete panel and material and do in one go or (as I did) spray half of the panel and of the material (see picture) and do it in 2 stages. You’ll need to have very clean hands and/or wear clean gloves. Wait until the glue is dry to the touch then start laying the material on to panel board slowly and firmly pressing and working into all the curves and corners. Start from bottom to top and again from left to right until you see the material ‘cling’ to the shape of the panel. Once you are satisfied with the result leave for 24 hours to thoroughly dry.

    Step 6.
    Cover work surface with clean, soft, covering then turn panel over and repeat gluing process on overhanging material. If you have a sun roof mark about 2.5 inches from the opening and cut out the material. Cut slits for fixing holes, light, sun visors, etc. Don’t make them too big, about 1/3 – ” wide, you can always adjust if need be later. Lastly glue a piece of material about 50cm X 30cm about 2/3rds at the rear onto the back of the panel to stop it rattling against the underside of the roof (see photo). Leave for another 24 hours.

    Step 7.
    Make a final check that everything’s done and how you want it, you can now place the panel back into the car. In effect the reverse procedure of how you extracted it. Start by fixing it with both the rear passenger hand grips, not completely tightened up, then the front passenger hand grip, both sun visors and rear plastic panel and rear seal. Once you are satisfied then tighten up all screws and put back all door seals and the interior light back in. With a thin plastic trim tool push panel (where necessary) over the pillar trim and tuck in material where necessary. If you don’t have a sun roof ignore Step 8, you’re finished.

    Step 8.
    Remove the thin plastic strip around the edging of the sun roof. Pull the liner material up and over the metal edges and ease the plastic strip back over the edges and material, this will secure it and give you a good finish inside the car (see photo). Do it slowly and carefully, you may need to use the plastic hammer to get it fitting properly, once you’re finished trim the excess material with a sharp knife. Check nothing is snagging the sun roof, then you’re done !

    *** It may be your sun roof undersides also need recovering, will depend on state of the material on it, I didn’t change mine, that’s for a future date.

    In total should take you about 6 – 7 hours even though that’s spread over 3 days drying time.
    Here are some useful tips :
    • Visualise the whole process and walk it through 2 or 3 times.
    • Make sure worktable is free of clutter and all tools close to hand.
    • Keep everything as clean as possible.
    • Work slowly and with small steps when pressing material onto the board after gluing.
    • Look for any blistering and correct.
    • Consult pictures – does yours look like these?

    Good luck
    Chris Lalor
    Mechelen
    Belgium 12 May 2020
    Last edited by Soulcharger; 10th June 2020, 07:22.

  • #2

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    • #3
      More photos
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        Even more photos
        Attached Files

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        • #5
          Well done. I would use 2 cans of adhesive though
          1958 Ford Consul Convertible, now being used
          1965 Ford Zodiac Executive. now being used
          1984 MG Montego EFi in black. Digital dash, Welding completed
          1984 MG Montego EFI in red. Digital dash, now sold
          2004 MGZT cdti. Great workhorse
          2004 MGZT V8. Back on the road. now being used

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jeff Turbo View Post
            Well done. I would use 2 cans of adhesive though


            When I ordered from Woollies they recommended just the 1 can. When I was gluing that last panel on the back I just had enough, not a second more !

            I'm gonna have a go at putting some material on that sun roof, will half open, glue some on the front part, then close it and up end it at rear (as you can) and cover there, might work

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Soulcharger View Post

              When I ordered from Woollies they recommended just the 1 can. When I was gluing that last panel on the back I just had enough, not a second more !

              I'm gonna have a go at putting some material on that sun roof, will half open, glue some on the front part, then close it and up end it at rear (as you can) and cover there, might work
              It's a bit touch and go with one can, I would normal use most of the on the rear as that's the first part that drops down. Best of luck with the sunroof section, I had to remove the whole sunroof tray to fix mine, but I had the headliner already removed so it was easier
              1958 Ford Consul Convertible, now being used
              1965 Ford Zodiac Executive. now being used
              1984 MG Montego EFi in black. Digital dash, Welding completed
              1984 MG Montego EFI in red. Digital dash, now sold
              2004 MGZT cdti. Great workhorse
              2004 MGZT V8. Back on the road. now being used

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jeff Turbo View Post

                It's a bit touch and go with one can, I would normal use most of the on the rear as that's the first part that drops down. Best of luck with the sunroof section, I had to remove the whole sunroof tray to fix mine, but I had the headliner already removed so it was easier
                If I'm not mistaken you had a Montego estate ? Mine's a smaller Maestro, guess time will tell :-)
                Last edited by Soulcharger; 14th May 2020, 08:06.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Soulcharger View Post


                  If I'm not mistaken you had a Montego estate ? Mines a smaller Maestro, guess time will tell :-)
                  Saloon and a few of them
                  1958 Ford Consul Convertible, now being used
                  1965 Ford Zodiac Executive. now being used
                  1984 MG Montego EFi in black. Digital dash, Welding completed
                  1984 MG Montego EFI in red. Digital dash, now sold
                  2004 MGZT cdti. Great workhorse
                  2004 MGZT V8. Back on the road. now being used

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here a picture of how lining is kept secure at sun roof. See gap in strip.
                    Attached Files

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